Top Ten Tuesday: Fall TBR

Top 10 TuesdayFall is here, and the weather has finally recognized that fact, so it’s a great time for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic: 10 books on your fall TBR list. I’m too much of a scaredy-cat to read actual horror, but a lot of the books on my list are spooky, gothic, Halloween-appropriate reads. I’m also excited to read a few new/upcoming releases, and then there are the fluffy romances that I’ll be enjoying during the 24-hour readathon in October! So, in no particular order…

1. Carl Hiaasen, Skink — No Surrender — I’ve had an ARC of this book since Book Expo America 2014. Time to finally read it!

2. Jay Kristoff, Nevernight — My lovely former secret sister Natasha (go visit her at A Binding Attraction!) got me a signed copy of this book! We’re going to buddy-read it in October.🙂

3. Neil Gaiman, The Ocean at the End of the Lane — Halloween is the perfect time for some creepy, magical Neil Gaiman.

4. Leigh Bardugo, Crooked Kingdom — I wasn’t blown away by the Grisha trilogy, but I loved Six of Crows and am dying to find out what happens to everyone in this sequel!

5. Shirley Jackson, We Have Always Lived in the Castle — I’ve never read anything by Shirley Jackson but have always been curious. My impression is that her books will be creepy enough to get me in the autumnal spirit without actually, you know, terrifying me.

6. Emma Mills, This Adventure Ends — I thought First & Then was very cute, so I’m definitely looking forward to reading Mills’s new book!

7. Connie Willis,  Crosstalk — My most anticipated release of 2016 by a mile! I’m such a Connie Willis fan, and this techno-rom-com sounds right up my alley!

8. Donna Moore, Old Dogs — The description of this one caught my eye: “Two septugenarian sisters take the classic heist to new levels in this addictive caper.” Sounds delightful, no?

9. Kasie West, P.S. I Like You — A young adult version of “You’ve Got Mail” is the perfect book for Hour 22 of the readathon!

10. Lindsey Kelk, We Were on a Break — Huzzah, a new Lindsey Kelk book is coming out! Obviously I’ll need to read it immediately.

Top Ten Tuesday: All-time favorite historical fiction

Top 10 TuesdayThis week’s Top Ten Tuesday is a tough one–we’re asked to list our all-time favorite books in a particular genre! Personally, it takes a lot for me to characterize a book as an all-time favorite. Then there’s the fact that I read in a variety of genres, so it’s hard for me to pick 10 books in just one genre that I’d consider all-time favorites. That said, here’s my list of top 10 all-time favorite works of historical fiction,* some of which can be classified in other genres as well! In no particular order:

1. Baroness Orczy, The Scarlet Pimpernel — It may not be the greatest novel from a literary standpoint, but it will always hold a special place in my heart! A French Revolution setting, spies disguised as dandies, swashbuckling heroes who rescue those in peril, and a wonderfully swoony romance all combine to make this one of my favorite books.

2. Sharon Kay Penman, Here Be Dragons — Sharon Kay Penman is one of my absolute favorite authors: She makes the Middle Ages come to life.  I’ve read and enjoyed most of her books, but my favorite is the Welsh trilogy, which starts with Here Be Dragons. It’s a fascinating blend of fact and fiction about a Welsh prince who strives to unite his people against the encroaching English barons. I’m making it sound dry, but it’s actually full of romance, action, and political machinations!

3. Georgette Heyer, The Grand Sophy — To be honest, I could populate this entire list with Georgette Heyer novels. She truly is the queen of Regency romance! The Grand Sophy is probably my favorite of her novels (although Cotillion and Sylvester are right up there as well!). It features a delightful cast of characters, a strong-willed heroine, and a tightly wound hero with a surprisingly kind heart. An utter delight from start to finish!

4. Kate Ross, Cut to the Quick — I don’t know why the Julian Kestrel mysteries aren’t more popular, but everyone who has read them will tell you they’re absolutely fantastic! The protagonist is a Regency dandy who solves crimes. If that doesn’t intrigue and excite you, I don’t know what will!

5. Elizabeth Wein, Code Name Verity — This is one of the more recent additions to my all-time favorites list. It’s an intense, compelling story of the friendship between two girls who are both “doing their bit” in World War II, one as a pilot and the other as a spy. Although I sobbed through the last 60 pages or so, I absolutely loved this book!

6. Robin McKinley, The Outlaws of Sherwood — I encountered Robin McKinley at an impressionable age, and I think I basically imprinted onto her books like a baby duckling. Her books are generally shelved as fantasy, but I think The Outlaws of Sherwood is more like historical fiction. There’s no magic or anything; the only fantasy element is that the main characters are Robin Hood and his merry men (and women!). For me, this book will always be the true Robin Hood story.

7. Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer, Sorcery and Cecelia — Regency England + romance + magic = my personal recipe for a fantastic book! This novel has it all, AND it’s epistolary!

8. Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society — I loved this epistolary novel set just after World War II, when a journalist strikes up a correspondence with several people who live on the island of Guernsey and learns about their wartime experiences. The voices of the various characters are wonderful, and I enjoyed their kindness toward one another, as well as their shared love of literature.

9. Mary Doria Russell, Doc — I haven’t read many Westerns and am not particularly interested in the genre. But when I read Doc, I immediately thought, “This is why I love historical fiction.” The novel completely immersed me in the dusty, lawless setting of the American West, and I found protagonist Doc Holliday as compelling as he was complex. I forced my mom (another reader who’s indifferent to Westerns) to read it also, and she was equally blown away!

10. Ellis Peters, One Corpse Too Many — I’ve often sung the praises of the Brother Cadfael novels, which feature a crime-solving Benedictine monk in 12th-century Shrewsbury. This novel (book #2 in the series) remains my favorite, probably because it introduces one of my literary crushes, Hugh Beringar!

*Note: My definition of historical fiction is novels that are set in an earlier time period than the one in which they were written. This means that Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities would be historical fiction (written in 1859, set during the French Revolution), but Bleak House would not (written and set in the mid-19th century). It also means that, much as I adore Jane Austen’s novels, none of them appear on this list!

Top Ten Tuesday: TV talk

Top 10 Tuesday Since the fall TV season is coming up, this week’s Top Ten Tuesday is all about television! As someone who watches more than her fair share of TV, I had no problem coming up with a list of ten TV shows I’ll be watching this fall. I’ve even limited my list to shows that will be airing new content in the fall, not old shows that I plan to binge-watch on DVD or Netflix!

1. Conviction (season 1), September 19, ABC — To be honest, the trailer doesn’t do a lot for me, and I’m kind of over case-of-the-week procedurals in general. On the other hand, I loved Hayley Atwell so much in Agent Carter that I’ll give the benefit of the doubt to any show she’s starring in!

2. The Good Place (season 1), September 19, NBC — I’m super excited for this new half-hour comedy, and my reasons are threefold. First, it’s created by Mike Schur, who worked on The Office and co-created Parks and Recreation and Brooklyn Nine-Nine (ahem, see below!). Second, it stars Kristen Bell, who was Veronica Mars, nuff said. And third, one of the writers is Demi Adejuyigbe, who co-hosts the brilliant Gilmore Guys podcast. A show with this many awesome people involved is a show I need to watch!

3. Brooklyn Nine-Nine (season 4), September 20, FOX — I mean, for this alone.

4. New Girl (season 6), September 20, FOX — I love the specific weirdness of the characters on this show. The individual episode plots are very hit-or-miss, and poor Winston is basically a grab bag full of crazy at this point…and yet, Nick Miller ranting will never not be funny.

5. This Is Us (season 1), September 20, NBC — I don’t really know what this one is about, but it stars Milo Ventimiglia, and I have a lot of Gilmore Girls nostalgia right now, so I’ll give it a try!

6. Pitch (season 1), September 22, FOX — The premise of this one caught my eye: the protagonist is the first female pitcher in major league baseball. I don’t care about sports, but I tend to love sports-related movies and TV shows (hello, Friday Night Lights!).

7. Poldark (season 2), September 25, PBS — I love a good costume drama, and the gorgeous footage of Cornwall makes Poldark especially pleasant to watch.

8. The Durrells in Corfu (season 1), October 16, PBS — Yup, I sure do love a good costume drama!🙂 And this one looks quite funny and charming.

9. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (season 2), October 21, CW — I was skeptical of this show at first, but I’m so glad I decided to give it a try because it is BRILLIANT! I can never decide which musical number is my favorite: this boy band homage, this Fred-and-Ginger routine, or this up-tempo number about a…personal ailment.

10. Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life, November 25, Netflix — YOU GUYS, THE GILMORE GIRLS REVIVAL IS COMING!!! Gilmore is my all-time favorite show, despite some rocky episodes (okay, seasons) near the end. I’m really excited that it’s coming back–helmed, as it should be, by Amy Sherman-Palladino–and can’t wait to see what all my beloved characters have been up to!

Mini-Reviews #7: Home stretch

You guys, I did it–I finally caught up with my review backlog!🙂 I’m hoping to do a better job of keeping up with reviews in the future, and hopefully I can be better about visiting other people’s blogs, too! In the meantime, here’s my last batch of mini-reviews, at least for now:

This Savage SongBoy Is Back, The

Victoria Schwab, This Savage Song — Set in a future where the United States has disintegrated into tiny, isolated city-states, humans and monsters live under an uneasy truce that could snap at any moment. Kate Harker is a human teenager whose father ensures the safety of humans who are willing to pay for his protection. August Flynn is a monster capable of stealing a person’s soul through song, but he’s trying desperately not to give in to his frightening hunger. When August and Kate meet and become friends, they search for a way to keep the peace between monsters and humans. I liked this book a lot; the world-building is excellent, and both Kate and August are intriguing characters. Much of the novel is a setup for the planned sequels, so there’s not a lot of closure in the end (although there’s no cliffhanger per se). But I definitely liked this one enough to continue with the series–looking forward to book #2!

Meg Cabot, The Boy Is Back — I’m pretty sure it was Meg Cabot’s The Boy Next Door that originally got me into chick lit, so I jumped at the chance to read this latest installment in the series. Becky Flowers has made it big in her small town, but she’s never forgotten her high school sweetheart, the one who got away. Reed Stewart is said sweetheart, a professional golfer who left town after graduation and never came back. When he returns to help care for his ailing parents, he and Becky reconnect…and of course, we all know where this is going. I didn’t actually care too much about the central romance–“old flame” isn’t one of my favorite tropes–but I loved the humor and the colorful characters that surrounded Becky and Reed’s story. I also enjoyed the fact that it’s a modern epistolary novel, told entirely through texts, emails, and even online reviews. Definitely recommended for fans of light, fluffy chick lit.

Arabella of MarsEdenbrookeEveryone Brave Is Forgiven

David D. Levine, Arabella of Mars — Three words, y’all: Regency space opera! I loved the idea of combining 19th-century British society with space travel (they use sailing ships!). Ultimately, this is a really fun adventure story wherein Arabella, dressed as a boy, joins the crew of a ship bound for Mars. There’s a handsome captain, a possibly sentient automaton, a mutiny, and a Martian uprising, and it’s all good fun. If you like the premise, you’ll really enjoy this one!

Julianne Donaldson, Edenbrooke — As with Donaldson’s other novel, Blackmoore, I enjoyed this “proper” Regency romance. Marianne Daventry is invited to Edenbrooke along with her sister Cecily, who hopes to marry the heir to the estate. When Cecily is detained in London, Marianne goes to Edenbrooke alone, and she soon finds herself attracted to the handsome and charming Philip–not realizing that he is the very heir her sister is pursuing. This was an entertaining read, but I couldn’t help being impatient with Marianne; it takes her forever to realize that Philip is the heir, and even longer to accept the fact that she’s in love with him. The book is still a pleasant read, but Donaldson isn’t destined to become a favorite author.

Chris Cleave, Everyone Brave Is Forgiven — This novel is a tale of love and loss set during  the early years of World War II. Mary North is an idealistic, privileged young woman who thinks the war is a great adventure, until the Blitz forces her to confront its ugly realities firsthand. Tom Shaw is an educator who isn’t seduced by the glamor of war; he just wants to keep doing his job. And Alistair Heath is Tom’s best friend, who enlists right away but soon realizes that the war might take more than he is willing to give. I wasn’t sure I would like this book at first–the prose definitely has A Style, and I was worried it might get in the way–but I ultimately found it very compelling. There are a lot of heartbreaking moments, but there’s also some great banter and great friendships. Overall, I’d definitely recommend this one to fans of World War II novels.

Mini-Reviews #6: Dog days

I can see the light at the end of the tunnel for these mini-reviews! I’ll do this post and one more, and then I should finally be caught up! *sobs with relief*

Murder on the LusitaniaSingle Girl's To-Do List, The

Conrad Allen, Murder on the Lusitania — This is a fairly pedestrian mystery novel set during the Lusitania’s maiden voyage, where ship’s detective George Porter Dillman thinks he’ll have to deal with nothing more exciting than a few thefts. Of course, when an unpopular journalist is murdered on board, Dillman has to investigate–and choose between two women, the beautiful but aloof Genevieve and the happy-go-lucky Ellen. I didn’t particularly like this book, mostly because the characters annoyed me. Dillman is too smug and superior, and Genevieve seems more like a male fantasy than an actual person. The solution to the mystery was fine but seemed to come out of nowhere–or perhaps I just stopped paying attention too soon. Overall, a very “meh” read, and I feel no desire to continue with the series.

Lindsey Kelk, The Single Girl’s To-Do List — After enjoying Always the Bridesmaid, I had to track down another Lindsey Kelk novel, and this one did not disappoint! Rachel has just been dumped by her long-term boyfriend and has basically forgotten how to be single, so her two best friends create “the single girl’s to-do list” to force her out of her comfort zone. I really liked that Rachel’s friendships were so central in the novel, remaining constant throughout her tumultuous love life. Of course, the ultimate romance comes as no surprise, and I would have liked the hero to be a little more fleshed out. Nonetheless, I liked this book a lot and will continue to read more by Kelk.

CotillionBetween Shades of Gray Blackmoore

Georgette Heyer, Cotillion — One of my very favorite Heyer novels, mainly thanks to its delightful hero, Freddy! He is a wonderfully unconventional leading man: not particularly handsome, not a ladies’ man, not overly burdened with brains. In fact, he reminds me of a slightly more functional Bertie Wooster. But of course, his “street smarts” and kind heart ultimately win the day!

Ruta Sepetys, Between Shades of Gray — This World War II novel centers around an aspect of the war that is sadly often forgotten. The narrator, Lina, is a 15-year-old Lithuanian girl who is abducted one night, along with her mother and brother, by the NKVD. Lina describes the horrible tortures and indignities she and her fellow prisoners suffer, as well as the desperate hope that somehow her father will find her. My favorite thing about this book is that many of the characters are portrayed with some complexity. For example, one of Lina’s fellow prisoners is a cranky old man who constantly complains, yet in the end he manages to do something heroic. Similarly, one of the Soviet guards is deeply conflicted about his cruel actions. But some of the other characters–particularly Lina’s saintly mother–remain annoyingly simplistic. I also wasn’t a fan of the flashbacks to Lina’s carefree earlier life; they were too jarring for me. Still, I liked the book overall, and I think it tells a story that needs to be told.

Julianne Donaldson, Blackmoore — Kate Worthington wants nothing more than to escape her horrible family and go to live in India with her aunt. But her mother refuses to let her go, finally delivering an ultimatum: if Kate wants to go to India, she must first receive–and reject–three marriage proposals. Since Kate is not beautiful and flirtatious like her sister, she despairs at first. But when she is invited to the estate of her old friends, Sylvia and Henry Delafield, she reasons that she can at least try. Of course, she doesn’t expect to fall in love along the way. While this book is extremely predictable, I have to say that I enjoyed it anyway! My biggest complaint is that it takes Kate far too long to realize that her ideal mate is right in front of her, head over heels in love. The Big Misunderstanding could easily have been solved with a little rational communication! I should also note that the book is subtitled “A Proper Romance,” which essentially just means it’s rated PG; there’s nothing explicitly religious or preachy about it. All in all, this was a pleasant read that satisfied my craving for a Regency romance.

Top Ten Tuesday: Back-to-school freebie

Top 10 TuesdayAs usual, it’s been a while since I’ve participated in a Top Ten Tuesday topic, but I couldn’t resist this back-to-school freebie! The topic asks for anything school-related, so my list is going to be the top 10 books I’d put on the syllabus for a “Mystery Novel 101” course, in (roughly) chronological order:

1. Edgar Allan Poe, “The Purloined Letter” and “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” — Technically these are short stories, but Poe is, according to the Poe Museum website, “widely acknowledged as the inventor of the modern detective story.” Both of these stories are notable for their surprise endings, although the solution to “Rue Morgue” would be considered insulting by most contemporary mystery lovers!

2. Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone — This one is remarkable for its use of mutliple points of view to describe the crime, the theft of a valuable jewel. It also exemplifies the sensationalism (and, unfortunately, Orientalism) typical of some 19th-century British literature, but it’s still a very compelling and suspenseful story.

3. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes — Obviously this list wouldn’t be complete without some Holmes and Watson on it! I picked Memoirs, even though it’s not the first collection of Sherlock stories, because it contains some of the canon’s most notable moments, including the introduction of Mycroft (“The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter”) and the dramatic confrontation with Moriarty (“The Final Problem”).

4-5. Agatha Christie, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd and Murder on the Orient Express — I may be a bit biased because I fell in love with Dame Agatha’s novels at an impressionable age, but I couldn’t resist including two of her most famous novels! Both of them have twist endings, and while they may not be very shocking now, that’s only because so many other authors have followed in her footsteps! Also, “30 Rock” did an amazing homage to Orient Express in episode 515, “It’s Never Too Late for Now.”

6. Anthony Berkeley, The Poisoned Chocolates Case — I don’t remember how I first came across this book, but I do remember my utter delight upon finishing it! This novel is a perfect example (and send-up) of the mystery tropes and conventions that, in 1929, had already become popular enough to satirize. Six armchair detectives each propose a solution to a murder, and each of them is amazingly plausible and clever (although, of course, only one is correct)!

7. Vera Caspary, Laura — I had to include a noir crime novel on the list, and while I could have gone with The Maltese Falcon or The Thin Man, I decided on Laura for the purely subjective reason that I really love the movie! But the novel is quite clever as well, and it uses the Wilkie Collins-esque technique of multiple narrators, some of whom are not exactly reliable.

8. Something by John Dickson Carr — Here I must admit with shame that I actually haven’t read anything by John Dickson Carr, despite his prolific career spanning the 1930s to the 1970s. But he is generally acknowledged to be the master of the “locked room” or impossible crime, a genre that has proved to be both popular and long-lasting.

9. Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, The Laughing Policeman — Scandi-crime has become popular in recent years, but in the 1960s, Sjöwall and Wahlöö were among the first Scandinavian mystery writers to gain fame in the US. This novel, an installment in the Martin Beck series, deals with a mass shooting on a public bus where one of the victims is a policeman. It’s a wonderful procedural that realistically describes the routines, the tedium, and the false starts that plague real-life criminal investigations.

10. Luis Fernando Verissimo, Borges and the Eternal Orangutans — Possibly the strangest book on the list, this novel is an homage to Edgar Allan Poe by way of Jorge Luis Borges. It’s hard to describe without giving too much away, but it’s very clever and a very quick read!

 

Mini-Reviews #5: Summer Reading

All right, time to post some mini-reviews of books I read way back in July! Will I ever catch up with all my reviews? Only time will tell, so stay tuned!🙂

Death of an AirmanSong for Summer, A

Christopher St. John Sprigg, Death of an Airman — In this mystery centered around an English aviation club, one of its best flyers perishes in a tragic plane crash. Most people assume it’s an accident, but the victim was a first-class pilot, and the inquest revealed nothing wrong with the plane. A few of the club members suggest suicide, but a visiting Australian bishop suspects murder. When the police get involved, they realize the victim’s death may be connected to a much larger criminal organization. I liked this mystery well enough, but I think the strength was definitely in the plot rather than in the characters. For example, for the first several chapters, it looks like the Australian bishop is going to be the sleuth, but suddenly everything switches to the police inspector’s point of view. Still, this was a fun variation on the “impossible crime” mystery with a truly ingenious solution.

Eva Ibbotson, A Song for Summer — Ibbotson’s novels are the ultimate comfort reads! I’d never reread this one before, and I think it’s because the plot moves a bit more slowly than in Ibbotson’s other novels, and the atmosphere is bleaker. It’s still a lovely book, but I definitely find myself returning to A Countess Below Stairs and The Morning Gift much more often.

It Happened One WeddingSpear of Summer Grass, ACrown's Game, The

Julie James, It Happened One Wedding — Julie James was my first contemporary romance author, and she pretty much single-handedly convinced me that not all romance novels are poorly written trash. This is another fun, banter-filled romance between hedge fund manager (?) Sidney and FBI agent Vaughn. They initially dislike each other but are forced to play nice when her sister and his brother get engaged. I think we all know where this is going.

Deanna Raybourn, A Spear of Summer Grass — After scandalizing English society with her outrageous behavior, Delilah Drummond is packed off to British East Africa so she won’t further damage her family’s reputation. Although Delilah is the consummate city girl, with her fashionable dresses and daring bob, she soon falls in love with the African landscape. She also encounters various dangers, from marauding lions to outright murder — and possibly finds love as well. I didn’t particularly like this book, and I’m not sure why. I didn’t dislike it either…I just felt indifferent to it. Delilah reminded me a lot of Phryne Fisher, but while I love Phryne, I didn’t have the same enthusiasm for Delilah. Maybe she was too similar (since I encountered Phryne first)? The romance also made me roll my eyes a bit; the hero is very much an alpha-male caveman type, and he just seemed like a stereotype to me. Overall, a “meh” read.

Evelyn Skye, The Crown’s Game — In an alternate Imperial Russia where magic exists but only a few have the power to wield it, Vika knows she is destined to become the Imperial Enchanter and take her place at the emperor’s side. But then she learns that there is another powerful enchanter in Russia — and that she must defeat him in the Crown’s Game, a magical duel in which the winner becomes Imperial Enchanter and the loser is condemned to death. Little does she know that the other enchanter is Nikolai, whose magic (and handsome face) intrigues her. As Vika and Nikolai get to know each other, they realize they don’t want the Crown’s Game to end in death. But will they be able to find a better solution? I have to admit, this book sort of lost me early on, when Vika is described as having wild red hair with a black streak down the middle. I immediately had a knee-jerk Mary Sue reaction, and I never quite warmed to Vika after that. I did end up somewhat liking the book, particularly for the Russian setting and the lovely descriptions of the magic. I also liked the fact that the stakes are real, and not everybody gets a happy ending. I’ll probably look for the sequel when it comes out. Nevertheless, I was definitely underwhelmed by this one, especially given the amount of hype I’d seen about it.

Bout of Books 17: Progress

Bout of BooksMonday 8/22

What I read: David D. Levine, Arabella of Mars — pp. 229-260.

Challenge: Book to Movie at Writing My Own Fairy Tale

“Clueless” is one of my all-time favorite movies, and it just happens to be a magnificent adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma! Although some aspects of the film are gloriously ’90s-tastic (the clothes, the slang, the soundtrack), the movie actually stays quite faithful to the novel’s original plot. And of course I can’t pick just ONE favorite adaptation, so I have to mention Kenneth Branagh’s “Much Ado About Nothing” as well! It’s gorgeous and exuberant and playful and just a joy to watch. On the other hand, I HATED Ron Howard’s live-action version of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” The 30-minute cartoon is a lovely holiday classic, but this remake absolutely did not need to happen!

Clueless movie posterMuch Ado About Nothing movie posterHow the Grinch Stole Christmas movie poster

Tuesday 8/23

What I read: David D. Levine, Arabella of Mars — pp. 261-348. Book 1 completed!
Julianne Donaldson, Edenbrooke — pp. 1-116.

Wednesday 8/24

What I read: Julianne Donaldson, Edenbrooke–pp. 117-255. Book 2 completed!

Challenge: Show Off Your Shelves at Bout of Books

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Thursday 8/25

What I read: Chris Cleave, Everyone Brave Is Forgiven — pp. 3-51

Challenge: Titles in the Tabloids at The Book Junkie

I chose the book Arabella of Mars by David D. Levine, and my tabloid headline is: “Murder! Mutiny! Martians! Runaway Teen Tells All.” The book is a good fit for this challenge because so many dramatic adventures take place! ☺️

Friday 8/26

This was a lost day for me…I read maybe one page of Everyone Brave Is Forgiven. Hopefully I’ll do better over the weekend!

Saturday 8/27

What I read: Chris Cleave, Everyone Brave Is Forgiven — pp. 52-67

Sunday 8/28

What I read: Chris Cleave, Everyone Brave Is Forgiven — pp. 69-116